ESL Questions About To Kill A Mockingbird [Updated]

Hey there, fellow ESL teachers! Today, we’re diving into a classic and timeless novel that holds a special place in the hearts of many readers: “To Kill a Mockingbird”. This Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee has captivated audiences for generations with its poignant storytelling and thought-provoking themes. So, grab a cup of tea, get comfortable, and let’s explore the world of “To Kill a Mockingbird” together. Whether you’re looking for engaging lesson ideas or insightful discussion points, this blog post has got you covered. Let’s embark on this literary journey and uncover the powerful lessons that this iconic novel has to offer!

ESL questions about to kill a mockingbird

ESL Speaking Questions About To Kill A Mockingbird

Beginner ESL Questions about To Kill a Mockingbird

  1. What is the title of the book?
  2. Who is the author of the book?
  3. Is To Kill a Mockingbird a novel or a play?
  4. Where is the story set?
  5. Who are the main characters in the story?
  6. What is the name of the town where the story takes place?
  7. What is the main topic or theme of the book?
  8. Who is Atticus Finch?
  9. What is Atticus Finch’s job?
  10. Who is Scout?
  11. How old is Scout at the beginning of the story?
  12. Who is Jem?
  13. What is Jem’s relationship to Scout?
  14. Who is Boo Radley?
  15. Why do the children hide from Boo Radley at the beginning of the story?
  16. Who is Calpurnia?
  17. What is Calpurnia’s role in the Finch family?
  18. Why is Atticus chosen to defend Tom Robinson?
  19. What is the outcome of the trial?
  20. What important lesson does Scout learn about “walking in someone else’s shoes”?




Intermediate ESL Questions about To Kill a Mockingbird

Intermediate ESL Questions about To Kill a Mockingbird

  1. What is the title of the book?
  2. Who is the author of To Kill a Mockingbird?
  3. When was To Kill a Mockingbird published?
  4. Where does the story take place?
  5. Who are the main characters in the book?
  6. What is the main theme of To Kill a Mockingbird?
  7. Why is the book considered a classic?
  8. How does Scout describe her father, Atticus Finch?
  9. What is Boo Radley like according to the rumors?
  10. What is the significance of the mockingbird symbol in the book?
  11. How does Scout and Jem’s perception of Boo Radley change throughout the story?
  12. What lessons does Scout learn about empathy and understanding?
  13. What role does racial prejudice play in the story?
  14. Who is accused of committing a crime in To Kill a Mockingbird?
  15. What is Atticus Finch’s profession?
  16. Why does Atticus agree to defend Tom Robinson?
  17. What is the outcome of Tom Robinson’s trial?
  18. How does the town react to Atticus defending Tom Robinson?
  19. What are some examples of injustice in the story?
  20. How does the story end, and what lesson does Scout learn?


Advanced ESL Questions about To Kill a Mockingbird

  1. What themes are explored in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird?
  2. How does the character of Atticus Finch embody moral integrity?
  3. Discuss the symbolism of the mockingbird in the novel.
  4. What role does racism play in the story?
  5. How does Harper Lee portray the concept of justice in the book?
  6. Explain the significance of the title To Kill a Mockingbird.
  7. Discuss the character development of Scout throughout the novel.
  8. Why do you think Boo Radley is considered a symbol of innocence?
  9. How does the town of Maycomb represent a microcosm of society?
  10. What lessons can be learned from the trial of Tom Robinson?
  11. Examine the importance of education in the novel.
  12. Discuss the role of gender expectations and stereotypes in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  13. What are the social and economic hierarchies depicted in the book?
  14. Why do you think Harper Lee chose to set the story in the 1930s?
  15. Explain the significance of the Radley house in the narrative.
  16. Discuss the significance of the character Calpurnia.
  17. What themes of morality and ethics are portrayed through the character of Bob Ewell?
  18. Why do you think Harper Lee includes the character of Dill in the story?
  19. Examine the use of symbolism in the novel, such as the snowman and the mad dog.
  20. Discuss the portrayal of parent-child relationships in To Kill a Mockingbird.
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ESL Reading Activities About To Kill A Mockingbird

Beginner ESL Activities About To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird is a classic novel written by Harper Lee. It is set in the 1930s in a small town called Maycomb, in the southern part of the United States. The story is narrated by Scout Finch, a young girl who lives with her older brother Jem and their father, Atticus Finch.

The town of Maycomb is filled with interesting characters. One of them is Boo Radley, who is rumored to be a ghost. Boo Radley lives in a creepy old house and is rarely seen outside. Scout, Jem, and their friend Dill make up stories and try to get a glimpse of Boo Radley.

Another important character in the story is Atticus Finch. Atticus is a lawyer and a very wise man. He believes in treating everyone with respect and fairness, no matter their skin color. Atticus takes on a difficult case, defending a black man named Tom Robinson who is wrongly accused of a crime.

The story explores themes of racism and prejudice, as well as the importance of empathy and understanding. Scout learns many valuable lessons throughout the book, as she grows up and begins to understand the unfairness in the world.

Vocabulary Word
Definition
Classic
A highly regarded work of literature that stands the test of time
Narrated
Told by a narrator or storyteller
Rumored
Something that people are talking about but may not be true
Creepy
Causing an eerie feeling or fear
Glimpse
A quick look or peek
Lawyer
A person who practices law and represents clients
Wise
Having or showing good judgment and knowledge
Racism
Belief in the superiority of one race over others, leading to discrimination
Prejudice
Preconceived opinion or bias without reason or experience
Empathy
The ability to understand and share the feelings of others

Intermediate ESL Activities About To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird is a famous novel written by Harper Lee. It tells the story of Scout Finch, a young girl growing up in the 1930s in a southern town called Maycomb. The book is set during a time of racial inequality and social injustice.

Scout is curious and adventurous, and she often gets into trouble with her brother Jem and their friend Dill. They spend their summers playing games and trying to catch a glimpse of Boo Radley, their mysterious neighbor. Boo is rarely seen outside his house, and there are many rumors and myths surrounding him.

Atticus Finch, Scout’s father, is a lawyer. He is appointed to defend Tom Robinson, a black man falsely accused of assaulting a white woman. Atticus is determined to prove Tom’s innocence, even though most of the town is against him. Scout and Jem learn about racism and injustice through their father’s case, and they witness the prejudice and hatred that exists in their community.

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Throughout the novel, Scout and Jem’s innocent and youthful perspective helps shed light on the moral issues of their society. They discover that prejudice and discrimination can have devastating consequences. Their experiences teach them the importance of empathy, justice, and standing up for what is right.

To Kill a Mockingbird is a thought-provoking and powerful book that addresses important themes such as racism, courage, and the loss of innocence. It is a timeless classic that encourages readers to reflect on the values and beliefs of society and to challenge injustice.

Vocabulary Word
Definition
novel
a long fictional story
racial
related to race or ethnicity
inequality
a lack of fairness or justice
injustice
a lack of fairness or justice
curious
eager to know or learn something
adventurous
willing to take risks or try new things
mysterious
difficult to understand or explain; strange
prejudice
unfair or biased opinion about someone based on their group
discrimination
unfair treatment of people based on differences
empathy
the ability to understand and share the feelings of others

Advanced ESL Activities About To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird, written by Harper Lee and published in 1960, is a powerful and influential novel that continues to resonate with readers today. Set in the fictional town of Maycomb, Alabama, during the 1930s, the story explores themes of racial injustice, prejudice, and the loss of innocence.

The protagonist, Scout Finch, narrates the story from her perspective as a young girl. As she grows up, she becomes increasingly aware of the social and racial inequalities that exist in her town. Her father, Atticus Finch, plays a central role in the novel as he defends Tom Robinson, a black man falsely accused of rape. Atticus’s unwavering belief in justice and equality serves as a moral compass for both Scout and the readers.

Throughout the novel, Lee skillfully portrays the complexities of human behavior and the consequences of prejudice. She introduces a range of characters, each representing different aspects of society. Scout’s interactions with her neighbor, Boo Radley, who is shrouded in mystery, teach her the importance of empathy and understanding.

To Kill a Mockingbird is not only a captivating literary work, but it also serves as a valuable tool for ESL learners. The novel uses rich vocabulary and explores important themes that spark meaningful discussions in the classroom. Here are ten vocabulary words to aid in comprehension:

Vocabulary Word
Definition
Resonate
Evoke a strong feeling or response
Injustices
Unfair treatment or behavior
Prejudice
Preconceived opinion or bias
Loss of innocence
The process of gaining awareness of the harsh realities of life
Protagonist
Main character or hero of a story
Defends
Support or protect someone from harm
Unwavering
Firm and determined
Consequences
The results or effects of an action
Empathy
The ability to understand and share the feelings of others
Comprehension
Understanding or grasp of a concept

By utilizing these words, you can enhance your reading and writing skills while engaging in thought-provoking discussions. Explore the world of To Kill a Mockingbird and be inspired by its timeless message of justice and empathy.

ESL Writing Activities About To Kill A Mockingbird

Beginner ESL Writing Questions about To Kill a Mockingbird

1. Describe the main characters in To Kill a Mockingbird and explain their role in the story.
2. What do you think the title “To Kill a Mockingbird” means? Write a short paragraph explaining your interpretation.
3. Imagine you are Scout, the main character in the book. Write a diary entry describing a memorable day in your life.
4. How does the theme of racism play a role in To Kill a Mockingbird? Provide specific examples from the book to support your answer.
5. Write a letter to Atticus Finch, the father of Scout, sharing your thoughts about the book and how it impacted you.

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Intermediate ESL Writing Questions about To Kill a Mockingbird

1. Analyze the symbolism of the mockingbird in To Kill a Mockingbird. What does it represent? Provide evidence from the book.
2. Compare and contrast the Finch and Ewell families in To Kill a Mockingbird. How do they differ in terms of social class, values, and behavior?
3. Write a character analysis of Boo Radley. How does he evolve throughout the story? What role does he play in teaching the children important life lessons?
4. Discuss the theme of prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird. How does Harper Lee present different forms of prejudice in the book? How does it affect the characters and the events?
5. Reflect on the importance of empathy in the novel. How does empathy influence the characters’ actions and relationships with others? Provide examples from the book to support your answer.

Advanced ESL Writing Questions about To Kill a Mockingbird

1. Explore the concept of justice in To Kill a Mockingbird. How is justice depicted in the book? Discuss Atticus Finch’s role in seeking justice and the challenges he faces.
2. Analyze the theme of childhood innocence in To Kill a Mockingbird. How does the loss of innocence affect the characters, particularly Scout and Jem? Provide examples from the book.
3. Discuss the role of women in the novel. How are women portrayed? Evaluate the strengths and limitations of female characters like Scout, Miss Maudie, and Aunt Alexandra.
4. Consider the narrative style of To Kill a Mockingbird. How does the use of Scout’s perspective shape the reader’s understanding of the story? Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this narrative technique.
5. Examine the setting of Maycomb County in To Kill a Mockingbird. How does the physical and social environment contribute to the events and themes of the book?

ESL Roleplay Activities about “To Kill a Mockingbird”

1. Character Interview: Students can choose a character from the novel “To Kill a Mockingbird” and prepare questions to interview each other. They should imagine being journalists and ask questions about the character’s personality, motivations, and experiences. This activity helps students develop their speaking and listening skills while exploring the characters’ perspectives.

2. Courtroom Drama: Divide the class into groups, with each group acting as the defense or prosecution team for a character in the novel. Assign a “judge” who will lead the trial. Students can create their own scenarios based on events in the book or use predefined ones. They will need to prepare questions, arguments, and evidence to present in front of the “court.” This activity emphasizes critical thinking, persuasive speaking, and teamwork.

3. Book Club Discussion: Create a book club atmosphere in the classroom where students take turns being the discussion leader for different chapters or themes in the novel. Students can come prepared with questions or discussion prompts related to specific scenes, characters, or themes in “To Kill a Mockingbird.” This activity encourages analytical thinking, active listening, and the ability to express opinions.

4. Storytelling Mime: Split the class into pairs and provide each pair with a specific scene from the novel. Without speaking, one student in each pair will use gestures and body language to act out the scene while the other student tries to guess which scene it is. Once the guess is correct, they can switch roles. The activity enhances non-verbal communication skills, vocabulary recall, and memory.

5. Literary Role Reversal: Assign students different roles from the book, such as Scout, Atticus Finch, or Calpurnia, and instruct them to rewrite a specific scene from an alternative character’s perspective. This activity encourages students to think critically about the events in the novel from different viewpoints, develop empathy, and enhance their writing skills.

Remember, these roleplay activities should be adapted to suit the language proficiency level of your ESL students.